Protecting and Conserving Water—Resources

From the New Community Project (http://www.newcommunityproject.org):

 

Perhaps one of the most effective tools for change is education. Whether you have children, teach school, teach in religious education or in some other manner have opportunity to impact young people  regarding the importance of protecting and conserving clean water, Project WET  (http://www.projectwet.org/usa/mas/flash/wet.html) is a great site for such an undertaking.

 

The people of Pakistan are dealing with the devastation of too much water at once. The catastrophic flooding has been linked to climate change, and current models suggest that there may be more of the same in years to come. For greater understanding of this situation and the ways this tragedy is connected to environmental stewardship, go to http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-10958760.

 

Simplify- Looking for practical ways to conserve water? Eartheasy  (http://eartheasy.com/live_water_saving.htm) offers 25 suggestions for using less water in the home and yard.  If that is not enough, over 100 water-conserving tips, games and educational resources can be found on Water Use It Wisely at http://www.wateruseitwisely.com/100-ways-to-conserve/index.php. Additionally, New Community Project offers Water Woes (http://newcommunityproject.org/water_use.shtml), a guide that will help elucidate the challenges faced by humanity in the struggle to make clean water accessible to all. A special section on bottled water and ideas for conservation can also be found therein.

 

Resources to promote awareness of water issues in the worship setting. Wade in the Water and Thirsty can be found at http://newcommunityproject.org/creativearts.shtml.

 

A Sad Truth-“Every eight months, nearly 11 million gallons of oil run off our streets and driveways into our waters—the equivalent of the Exxon Valdez oil spill.”

“America’s Living Oceans”

 

What’s to eat? It takes 25 gallons of water to produce a pound of wheat, while 2,500 gallons are required to produce a pound of meat. Preservation of that essential liquid is yet another reason to eat less meat (or no meat at all).

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